A great CV in medicine, as in any industry, has one job which is to tell your potential employer what you have to offer and why you deserve an interview. But how much detail do you need? Should you include your “Outside Interests”? What about a photo?  It can get confusing and overwhelming, especially when you’re applying for a job you really want or one you know is highly competitive

 

So, what elements make a Great CV in Medicine?

Below are the essential sections that I suggest you include in your CV, whether you’re applying for your first specialty job as a junior doctor or a senior doctor making the next move in your career:

 

1. NAME AND CONTACT DETAILS

• Your name should appear in large font at the top of the page

• Your contact details should be your phone number and email address

• You don’t need to include your home address or your date of birth

• Include your AHPRA registration number here

 

2. CAREER STATEMENT

• This should be a short section (a paragraph or two) outlining your career objectives and highlighting your key strengths and achievements

 

3. EDUCATION/QUALIFICATIONS

 • In reverse chronological order

 

4. WORK EXPERIENCE/EMPLOYMENT HISTORY

• In reverse chronological order

•  For junior doctors, you should include all the terms you’ve done. As you become more senior, less detail is required

• Don’t leave unexplained gaps or omissions. If you’ve taken time off for any reason, you need to make this clear

 

5. RESEARCH

 • Include any research completed or in progress

 

6. PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

 •  Include details of any relevant courses you’ve done

 

7. TEACHING/LEADERSHIP/QUALITY IMPROVEMENT/OTHER PROFESSIONAL ROLES

• You can modify the headings of other categories to suit your content so think carefully about any hospital committees you’ve been on, any audits you’ve taken part in, and anything else you’d like to highlight

 

8. REFEREES

• Make sure you ask them!

• Make sure you have the best contact details for them

 

Some additional advice

• Keep your font and formatting simple and consistent

• Check spelling and grammar very carefully

• Don’t get too hung up about the length of your CV. There’s no rule that says it has to be two pages or less. Having said that, don’t include unnecessary details or make it longer than it needs to be

• Personally, I don’t recommend photos, but some employers require them. If you’re going to use a photo, make sure it’s a good one that looks friendly and professional

• Whether or not you include outside interests or extra-curricular activities is up to you. If your activities have some relevance to your work or give an indication of you and your personality, you may decide to include them. For example, if you’re involved in volunteer or community work, play team sport or have a leadership role outside of work, you may want to highlight this.

• Don’t forget, this is one of the opportunities you have in the application process to highlight your skills and attributes so make sure you sell yourself

• Don’t leave it until the last minute

If you’d like some help, get in touch.